Heat a greenhouse (environmentally friendly please)

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cookknitwine
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Heat a greenhouse (environmentally friendly please)

Post: # 292304Post cookknitwine
Tue Jan 08, 2019 9:04 pm

I try to grow as organically as possible, but my seedlings would benefit from heat in greenhouse.

I'd rather not use paraffin heaters (fumes smoke etc)
nor gas canisters (ditto)
I could run electricity to greenhouse, but this isn't really self sufficient.

Anyone got any good ideas?

Thank you xx

ina
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Re: Heat a greenhouse (environmentally friendly please)

Post: # 292305Post ina
Tue Jan 08, 2019 9:22 pm

Didn't they use to put muck heaps in greenhouses to benefit from the heat?
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Flo
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Re: Heat a greenhouse (environmentally friendly please)

Post: # 292308Post Flo
Wed Jan 09, 2019 9:03 am

You're thinking of the old Victorian glass houses where these was a regular supply of very fresh manure from mainly horses but other stock such as cattle ina. However it's possible to use the system if you have access to the right ingredients for the beds - https://www.gardenorganic.org.uk/faqs/h ... vegetables

Not sure how easy it is to do unless you have access to the right materials (friends who keep hens, the odd straw bale, a riding stable ...)

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Re: Heat a greenhouse (environmentally friendly please)

Post: # 292312Post Green Aura
Wed Jan 09, 2019 9:47 am

Yes, a hot bed works quite nicely - any riding stables nearby will often be glad of someone to take away some of their fresh "hosh" (as my Dad used to call it). Bury it quite deep though so there's no danger of any plant roots touching it until it's been there a good few months and rotted sufficiently.

The other, more technological method is a heat sink. We used a reversed fan, run by a small solar panel, which draws warmer air from the warmest part of the greenhouse down a pipe to a large underground box filled with some sort of heat absorbing material. We used gravel but there are other materials such as ground glass, sand etc that will do the same job. A second small pipe at ground level releases the warm air to the coolest part. If you want to get really techy you can put a battery on the solar panel to store some energy to keep the system running in the dark. We never got that far, heat rises after all, and the temp at ground level never got below 1-2C, even in the really bad winter in 2010 when we were sub zero for several days.
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Re: Heat a greenhouse (environmentally friendly please)

Post: # 292314Post Odsox
Wed Jan 09, 2019 10:20 am

All the above, plus another tech method is a hot water system, something I've been meaning to do for ages, but not got "around to" yet even though I have all the parts.
Solar panel heating, get an old radiator, paint it matt black, install it somewhere facing south at about 20°slant, pipe it up to an indoor tank and then you will have warm water available to pipe wherever you want, or just use the tank as a radiator.
If the tank is above the black radiator it will work by thermo-syphon so no need of any pumps.

I'm not sure how effective it would be during winter, but on a nice sunny day in March I would expect it to work very well, and it's nice sunny days in March that usually produce cold frosty nights.

Welcome to our forum by the way. :wave:
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Disclaimer: I almost certainly haven't a clue what I'm talking about.

cookknitwine
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Re: Heat a greenhouse (environmentally friendly please)

Post: # 292316Post cookknitwine
Wed Jan 09, 2019 9:23 pm

Some great ideas and being rural there are sources of hot bed 'fuel' pretty close, there are two stables in the village so I shall see how I go with collecting 'hosh' (new word to me so of course I giggled!)

I had thought about solar panels linked to heaters and the radiator idea is great; but think I'll start with the manure hot bed first. Presumably I can eventually replace old heating 'fuel' with fresher and move depleted 'heat core' to compost bins and mix in.

And thanks for being welcoming and would wave back if I could get the little man to copy across!

ina
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Re: Heat a greenhouse (environmentally friendly please)

Post: # 292321Post ina
Thu Jan 10, 2019 12:52 am

Have another wave: :wave: :wave: :wave:

(You have to go into "Full Editor & Preview" for that.)
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Re: Heat a greenhouse (environmentally friendly please)

Post: # 292322Post Green Aura
Thu Jan 10, 2019 9:45 am

cookknitwine wrote:
Wed Jan 09, 2019 9:23 pm
Presumably I can eventually replace old heating 'fuel' with fresher and move depleted 'heat core' to compost bins and mix in.
Yes, once it's finished composting (which produces the heat) you dig it up and place a new layer underneath. Just remember you need a good layer of compost/soil etc over the top to grow in (we used to grow in tubs on top of the soil so there was no chance of burning the roots.)

Dad was happy to use hosh, sheepsh or cowsh. :lol:
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Re: Heat a greenhouse (environmentally friendly please)

Post: # 292796Post ThomasChandler
Sat Jun 08, 2019 7:00 pm

cookknitwine wrote:
Wed Jan 09, 2019 9:23 pm
Some great ideas and being rural there are sources of hot bed 'fuel' pretty close, there are two stables in the village so I shall see how I go with collecting 'hosh' (new word to me so of course I giggled!)

I had thought about solar panels linked to heaters and the radiator idea is great; but think I'll start with the manure hot bed first. Presumably I can eventually replace old heating 'fuel' with fresher and move depleted 'heat core' to compost bins and mix in.

And thanks for being welcoming and would wave back if I could get the little man to copy across!
*****
:wave: I think you are right this is the the perfect idea. I had also thought about solar panels linked to heaters and the radiator . :icon_smile:

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Re: Heat a greenhouse (environmentally friendly please)

Post: # 292861Post MikeWaites
Tue Jul 23, 2019 3:36 pm

Flo wrote:
Wed Jan 09, 2019 9:03 am
You're thinking of the old Victorian glass houses where these was a regular supply of very fresh manure from mainly horses but other stock such as cattle ina. However it's possible to use the system if you have access to the right ingredients for the beds - https://www.gardenorganic.org.uk/faqs/h ... vegetables

Not sure how easy it is to do unless you have access to Agoc Travel the right materials (friends who keep hens, the odd straw bale, a riding stable ...)
Yes, the old victorian house is the best option for growing plants and crops. My friend also uses this on his farm and he saves a good amount of electricity which is a nice thing. I think everyone should use this.
Last edited by MikeWaites on Tue Jul 30, 2019 3:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Heat a greenhouse (environmentally friendly please)

Post: # 292862Post Green Aura
Tue Jul 23, 2019 6:05 pm

Hi Mike, welcome to Ish. :wave:
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Never doubt that you can change history. You already have. Marge Piercy

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Re: Heat a greenhouse (environmentally friendly please)

Post: # 292954Post LarryAnderson
Tue Sep 03, 2019 10:52 am

ThomasChandler wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2019 7:00 pm
cookknitwine wrote:
Wed Jan 09, 2019 9:23 pm
Some great ideas and being rural there are sources of hot bed 'fuel' pretty close, there are two stables in the village so I shall see how I go with collecting 'hosh' (new word to me so of course I giggled!)

I had thought about solar panels linked to heaters and the radiator idea is great; but think I'll start with the manure hot bed first. Presumably I can eventually replace old heating 'fuel' with fresher and move depleted 'heat core' to compost bins and mix in.

And thanks for being welcoming and would wave back if I could get the little man to copy across!
*****
:wave: I think you are right this is the the perfect idea. I had also thought about solar panels linked to heaters and the radiator . :icon_smile:
Yeah, this man is right. It would also be beneficial for nature.

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