Let's hear it for dandelions!

Foods for free. Anything you want to post about wild foods or foraging, hunting and fishing. Please note, this section includes pictures of hunting.

Sorry to say that Selfsufficientish or anyone who posts on here is liable to make a mistake when it comes to identification so we can't be liable for getting it wrong.
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Green Aura
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Re: Let's hear it for dandelions!

Post: # 150862Post Green Aura »

We have friends coming for dinner tonight.

So perusing my recipe database I came across this.

Dandelion Petal Risotto

200 g dandelion petals
3 tbsp olive oil
1 small onion, peeled and finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, crushed
170 g Arborio rice
125 ml dry white wine
½ tsp salt
500 ml light vegetable stock – kept at a slow
simmer
100 g Vegetalia (vegetarian parmesan
substitute)
to taste: freshly ground black pepper

To prepare the dandelion petals, wash the flowers under running water and shake dry. Cut off the stalk at the base of the flowers, removing and discarding all the green bits. Separate out the petals.

Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium heat in a large skillet. Add the onions and sauté until softened. Add garlic and rice and stir for 2 minutes. Add wine and salt and cook stirring until wine is nearly evaporated.

Add half of the vegetable stock and stir frequently until stock has been absorbed. Continue this process until all the stock has been absorbed and the rice is soft.

Add the Vegetalia, dandelion petals and seasoning.

Transfer to a bowl and allow to chill for half an hour.

To make the cakes, shape the chilled risotto into 8 small cakes, about 3cm in diameter. Heat 2 tablespoons oil over a high heat in a heavy skillet and when oil is hot, carefully place the cakes into skillet. Turn the heat down and brown the cakes on one side, turning over to brown the other side.

Serve as a starter with salad and a tomato sauce.

Note - This is a recipe for early spring when fresh sweet dandelion flowers are in abundance – don’t be tempted to use older summer dandelion flowers as they can be very bitter.

Just made the risotto - delicious.
Maggie

Never doubt that you can change history. You already have. Marge Piercy

Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage. Anais Nin

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hedgewitch
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Re: Let's hear it for dandelions!

Post: # 151003Post hedgewitch »

Lessons from a Dandelion
by Donna Doyon


I recall as a young child bringing bouquets of brilliant yellow flowers to my mother. It didn't matter that the stems felt sticky or that both my parents cursed the presence of these flowers in the lawn. I thought they were beautiful!

And there were so many of them! We spent hours picking the flowers and then popping the blossoms off with a snap of our fingers. But the supply of dandelions never ran out. My father or brothers would chop off all the heads with the lawn mower at least once a week, but that didn't stop these hardy wonders.

And for those flowers that escaped the honor of being hand delivered to my mother, the horror of a childish sing-song game of "Mama had a baby and its head popped off" or the sharp blades of the lawn mower, there was another level of existence.

The soft, round puffs of a dandelion gone to seed caused endless giggles and squeals of delight as we unwittingly spread this flower across the yard.

As I worked in my garden last week, pulling unwanted weeds out of the space that would become a haven for tomatoes, corn, peas and sunflowers, I again marveled at the flower that some call a weed. And I thought, "If only I had the staying power of a dandelion."

If only I could stretch my roots so deep and straight that something tugging on my stem couldn't separate me completely from the source that feeds me life. If only I could come back to face the world with a bright, sunshiny face after someone has run me over with a lawnmower or worse, purposely attacked me in an attempt to destroy me. If only my foliage was a nutritious source of vitamins that help others grow. If only I could spread love and encouragement as freely and fully as this flower spreads seeds of itself.

The lawns at my parents' home are now beautiful green blankets. The only patches of color come from well-placed, well-controlled flowerbeds. Chemicals have managed to kill what human persistence couldn't.

I hope you and I can be different. I hope that we can stretch our roots deep enough that the strongest poison can't reach our souls. I hope that we can overcome the poisons of anger, fear, hate, criticism and competitiveness. I hope that we can see flowers in a world that sees weeds.
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Plant Seeds and sing songs.

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Green Aura
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Re: Let's hear it for dandelions!

Post: # 151053Post Green Aura »

Dinner was postponed, due to one of our friends being unwell.

We had the dandelion patties for a starter this evening and they were lovely, although I have to say I'm not sure what the dandelion petals added to the flavour - they're so delicately flavoured.
Maggie

Never doubt that you can change history. You already have. Marge Piercy

Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage. Anais Nin

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Re: Let's hear it for dandelions!

Post: # 151068Post shell »

this is from a newsletter i recieved from a herbalist i took a course with here in Ireland,i have deleted the sender ,although it stated all can be passed on,if you want the website pm me,not sure i`m allowed to print it as it may be looked on as advertising
Dandelions
This month we will see dandelions flowering abundantly along the hedgerows. So now it is time to gather the leaves of this useful 'weed', .Dandelion root is a good liver tonic but is best harvested in the autumn so this time we will concentrate on the leaf and its uses. The leaf is very nutritious and makes a good spring tonic and de-toxifier. It contains vitamins B, C and a precurser to Vitamin A, also many minerals including potassium. Its main medicinal use is as a diuretic which is not surprising when folklore refers to it as 'piss-a-bed' ! This means it can be used to help with many urinary problems- from cystitis, prostatitis- even bedwetting! As a diuretic it can also be used to lower blood pressure but care must be taken if you are already taking blood pressure medication. A common problem with diuretics is that with an increase in the amount of urine excreted from the body there is also an increase in the amount of potassium excreted, which could have serious implications. As dandelion leaf is one of the highest plant sources of potassium, often replacing more potassium than it excretes, this problem does not occur. Make sure that you collect dandelion leaf from a clean (preferably organic) source, where no sprays or fertilizers have been applied recently and not too close to heavy traffic fumes. Pick nice young leaves and use them fresh in salads or in sandwiches. They have quite a bitter taste similar to endive. They may also be added to soups or stews or can be made into a tea by using 5-6 leaves to a cup of boiling water. Leave to brew for 5-10 minutes before straining. Dry some leaves to keep for later in the year by spreading out on a tray lined with greaseproof or kitchen paper and leave in a warm, dark place for a week. Make sure they are well dried before cutting into pieces and storing in a dark glass container.Pilewort or Lesser Celandine grows abundantly along the ditches and hedgerows and in damp river margins. It is used, as its name suggests, to help relieve haemorrhoids or ‘piles’. It can also be used in the treatment of varicose veins. For bleeding haemorrhoids it is best to use pilewort together with an astringent herb such as witchhazel, yarrow or plantain.


Pilewort, Lesser Celandine
Ranunculus ficaria

Jinwin
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Re: Let's hear it for dandelions!

Post: # 151244Post Jinwin »

Has anyone ever tried making dandelion and burdock? And if so, does it taste like the drink you buy in shops?

grumpy jock
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Re: Let's hear it for dandelions!

Post: # 152052Post grumpy jock »

Supermarket anything never tastes as good as fresh out the ground. But at least you know they haven't been christened by dogs or tainted with herbicides, car fumes etc. The leaves- very bitter but could be an acquired taste. Young leaves are nicer. Dandelion root coffee... one of my favourite things. Delicious and for me, worth the work of cleaning, and roasting... (i 'roast' them, chopped up in an iron skillet and it's good enough by my reckoning, but everyone else recommends proper roasting in oven). Autumn is the best time for roots. Leaf tea... very nice.
Having read the replies, I see some bonnie ideas to try. I also wonder about Dandelion and Burdock, I'd LOVE to try it, and will check Google for recipe.
ps Relieved to add- have never yet had nocturnal accident after enjoying dandelion.

pps, there's an amazing old guy on the net who claims he cured cancer with Dandelion- and he prepares it in a meticulous, specific way, harvested at right time of year or something. He's on a real missionary crusade about it. Fascinating. Sorry if it sounds irresponsible to repeat such claims- so here is his story for you to judge:
http://www.cancertutor.com/Cancer02/DandelionRoot.html

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Re: Let's hear it for dandelions!

Post: # 152053Post grumpy jock »

Wow, this looks fantastic (though I might suggest adding a little root ginger and some star anise)


Dandelion and Burdock

Ingredients



2 large Burdock roots
2 Dandelion roots
4.5 litres/1 gallon of water
500g/1lb caster sugar
2 tbs black treacle
Juice of 1 lemon
Yeast



Wipe the roots clean and cut off their leaves.; cut the roots into small pieces. Put the chopped roots into a pan with 2.2 litres/4 pints water and boil for 30 minutes.

Add the sugar, treacle and lemon juice to the rest of the water in a large pan and simmer. After 30 minutes, strain off the roots and leave the liquid to cool.

Meanwhile, mix the yeast with some warm water so it starts fermenting. When the root liquid is tepid, add the yeast. Leave it to ferment in the bucket for 3-4 days. Put into bottles and drink after a week.

The recipe has been taken from A Cook on the Wild Side:
http://www.rivercottage.net/SeasonalRec ... pring.aspx

I hope it's ok to post links to the River Cottage bloke's site, above.

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