Livestock: know your limits!!

Do you keep livestock? Having any problems? Want to talk about it, whether it be sheep, goats, chickens, pigs, bees or llamas, here is your place to discuss.
Batfink
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Livestock: know your limits!!

Post: # 18206Post Batfink »

Just a word of warning to you all: cows are unpredictable!

This sounds like a bit of a lame piece of advice, but on Saturday I had my first cow related injury in 8 years of dealing with them. Whether complacency lay at the route cause of it (I'd like to think it wasn't) or whether the cow was just feeling a bit skitsh, I know not.

What happened was that I was out feeding them some sugar beet (trying to up their energy levels after one of the hardest calving seasons any of us have seen - we suspect poor weather, and lack of grass have meant the cows have held back on calving for a couple of weeks - meaning the calves have all been significantly bigger than normal). I noticed two of the heifers weren't there, so took half a bag of food up the field to find them. Their absence normally means they're with a calf - either new born, or fast asleep, and are reluctant to leave it. To combat this (and them missing their hard earned food) I've been feeding them insitu.

Heifer number one had calved that morning, and both were healthy, I dumped half a bag of food a few metres away and left her to it. Heifer number two had also calved that morning, both were fine and had already been checked out by myself earlier in the day - however after feeding her I turned and walked away.

There was an almighty thundering behind me and so I looked over my shoulder to see the cow within about 25cm of me, the next thing I knew I had a lot of pain in my left leg, and was suddenly laying face down on the ground, with her charging over the top of me. Then there was a crushing pain in my left leg and then peace and tranquility returned to the field... except for me screaming! Quite what I did wrong we don't know - perhaps she was unhappy with the quality or quantity of food - who knows!

What I do know is that being knocked over and trampled by a British White isn't a pleasant experience, and, if it were a ride at a funfair, you wouldn't see me at the front of the queue. I have damaged all the ligaments in and around my knee, and will mostly be in bed for the next couple of days trying to keep the load off it! Gutted for me!

I was just wondering - whilst laying here dosed up on drugs, deep heat rubbed into my leg (and everywhere else I've touched since!), has anybody else experienced any other livestock related injuries???
Just because it feels good, it doesn't make it right.

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Millymollymandy
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Post: # 18218Post Millymollymandy »

Sorry to hear that and I hope you get better soon. :( Do you have someone to help with the farmwork?

I got run over/trampled by a vicious pony when I was a kid but all I had to show for it were horseshoe shaped bruises on my back. It helps being about 13 years old because you just don't get hurt!

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Post: # 18227Post Wombat »

Sorry, all I can report are cat scratches :cat: and chook pecks!

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Post: # 18232Post Batfink »

Millymollymandy wrote:Sorry to hear that and I hope you get better soon. :( Do you have someone to help with the farmwork?
Ta. My father-in-law will be working the farm 100% for the foreseeable future whilst I take some time off to recover. Doctor says at least a week until I walk on it again.

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Just because it feels good, it doesn't make it right.

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Hepsibah
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Post: # 18233Post Hepsibah »

*sympathy* :(
I suppose it takes something like this to remind us that livestock are bigger and stronger than us and always to be on guard.
My OH was once savaged by a sow who had recently farrowed. It pinned him to the floor and bit into his belly. It took five men to drag her off. He wouldn't turn his back on another one now either.
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Livestock injuries

Post: # 18274Post Kfish »

Technically this isn't livestock but rather one spoilt pony ...

My grandparents had a Shetland who got into the habit of walking through the verandah into the kitchen. One day I grabbed him by the mane and attempted to haul him off the verandah. He didn't have a lot of purchase on the tiles though, and when I tried to make him follow me down a few steps he panicked, slipped, jumped, and landed on my bare foot! :pale:

My grandparents then got a fair demonstration of my command of the English language. :oops:

I was also chased around the yard by a stroppy bantam rooster when I was four. This tiny little bastard had me convinced he was going to peck me to death. Goes to show what a little confidence can do, hey?

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Post: # 18280Post FluffyMuppet »

When I was little a couple of my mum's relatives lived on a farm (they have now both passed away) and they had a ewe which had been hand raised and acted as a Guard Sheep! I suppose it wasn't too intimidating to an adult, but my midriff was at her head height and every time she saw me she head-butted me and knocked me over :shock:

When I was a teenager the sheep was gone but they had a labrador/collie puppy which was seriously overfed and pinned me to the wall with its paws on my shoulders. It was only being friendly but my dad had to come and rescue me.

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Post: # 18505Post Goodlife1970 »

Now dont laugh,but I was molested by an amourous turkey! He decided that I must have been a female Norfolk Black (ok so I WAS a Goth at the time) and did his little display for me. Seeing that I wasnt about to get jiggy with it he launched himself at me catching me full on in the boob dept and sent me sprawling in the mud! Had bruised ribs (so not funny) and breastbone,a twisted ankle and cuts to my face,and it was just a flippin TURKEY! Just not the same as being trampled by a cow is it?
Now, what did I come in here for??????

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Post: # 18509Post alcina »

:( Hope there's nothing permanent Bat :(

I have to say I've always been really scared of cows. Other people say they're soft and gentle but I just think they're really large and really heavy and even if they don't intend to hurt they are so much bigger than us and just a little leaning in the wrong place... I can't image what it must be like to have a cow with avengeance in mind coming at you! :shock: :?

The only experience I have with livestock injuries is being attacked by a flying shaolin cockrel...well that's what he reminded me of in the few seconds before his spurs hit my face! I could almost hear him crying "Hiiiiii-jah!" I swear I saw a black belt around his waist... Had it been a ninja cow, I'd not be here to tell the tale! :wink:

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Ooohooohoooh!! I'm Barbara! :cheers:

Alcina

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Post: # 18538Post nick »

Being a freshly calved heifer, she was most likely a bit maternal. All breeds have cows that react at both ends of the scale - either walk away and forget about the calf or be very protective. you will probably find that after a couple of weeks she will settle down again. if you keep the cow just remember for next year when she calves.
A couple of incidents - one was at a cattle show where a bull was playing up on it's handler, it came sideways very quickly, went over top, knocked me out. it somehow put its feet either side of me.
have had teeth knocked through bottom lip and been kicked numerous times while working cattle for people.

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Post: # 18837Post Hillbilly »

Come shearing time on local estate I get mauled, kicked and charged more times than I care to remember. I've also been knocked out by a goat and scared witless by geese masquerading as vampires at my window (ok last one not technically violence related..)

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Post: # 18875Post Batfink »

A quick update. After a week of RICE, numerous doctors appointments, and the realisation that physio appointments take 10-12 weeks to come through (by which time I would more than likely be heeled anyway), I decided to sneak away for a weekends gentle relaxation in rural Hants. Some gentle walking and start building up strength in my leg.

Meanwhilst the in-laws - who's farm it is - are left looking after the place. On Saturday they are moving the whole herd between too fields, when the heifer who damaged me starts playing up. To cut a long story short, the mother-in-law was picked up off the floor and thrown a couple of feet, and the father-in-law has strained his shoulder. Both are covered (literally) in brusies.

That cows days may well be numbered!
Just because it feels good, it doesn't make it right.

ina
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Post: # 18901Post ina »

Hi Batfink

Cows are quite dangerous when they have young and are feeling over protective... Glad to hear that you are back on your feet. Yes, I think you'd be better off getting rid of that cow. She's probably a phantastic mum, but you've got to be able to live with her, too!

I'm always bruised in all sorts of places. And that's just sheep and goats (most of them horned, though). Because we handle our sheep a lot, they have lost all fear of us and literally walk all over us, if they get a chance! They even had my boss (6 foot something, hobby weight lifting) on the ground and trampled the other day. Feeding them out on the hill today, one of them had the front legs on my shoulders, while another one tried to get onto the quad...

I think I've just been lucky (and very careful) to have got away with no worse injuries so far than cuts and bruises.
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Post: # 19170Post Stonehead »

Does being rubbed to bits by two over-friendly gilts count? It doesn't sound like much, but when they're nine months old, one on either side of you, both standing on your feet (fortunately with steel toe caps as always) and both having a hard rub, it's definitely an experience to avoid!

Our smaller cockerel gets a bit over-excited every couple of weeks and has to be reminded who's boss. I carry a watering can with the rose removed and simple give him a good hosing. He then skulks off to a corner and crows defiantly when he thinks I'm not looking.

Other than that, most of my encounters date back a few years...

Like barrelling down a dirt road in the west of NSW and suddenly having a very large and very angry bull charge straight into the Toyota Landcruiser. He bent the heavy duty bullbar and I had serious seat-belt burn, so I thought he was a goner.

However, when I tracked down the farmer and we went looking for the bull, we found him lurking in a gully. We couldn't get near him, but as he was walking about, snorting, pawing the ground and generally acting up we were pretty sure he was okay. The farmer said he'd keep an eye on him for a couple of days.

Non-livestock ones included being attacked by a feral cat while out shooting goats (feral cats are big, dirty and mean); being knocked over by a runaway wombat; being jumped on by a roo while sleeping in a tent (luckily on my thigh and not my chest); and going face to face with a feral boar in a gully choked with lantana (sorry mate, but double barrelled shotgun with SG shells trumps big tusks anyday!).

Anecdotes aside, my main rules are never get between mum and baby, never get between the boy and his herd/mob/flock, never turn your back on livestock when you're in a pen or field with them, always have an escape route planned and never, ever own a goose (a painful and embarassing story!).
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Post: # 19196Post Hepsibah »

I just got geese.... :shock:
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