Vegetables in boggy ground

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zaxdog
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Vegetables in boggy ground

Post: # 223182Post zaxdog
Mon Feb 07, 2011 9:43 pm

Hi all,

We moved last year to the Isle of Lismore and we are determined to put in a veggie garden. However the ground we have is quite boggy and squishy. We are between the base of a cliff and the sea so we get a fair amount of run off water. Any tips on what we can grow to eat in this kind of ground? There has been much joking about rice fields etc but I promise it isn't that wet!!! :iconbiggrin:

All help thankfully received x

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Re: Vegetables in boggy ground

Post: # 223186Post sarahkeast
Mon Feb 07, 2011 9:55 pm

Raised beds ? I am not as wet as you, but have a lot of rain and not great drainage but seem to have decent results from my scaffold plank edged beds.

Good luck.
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Re: Vegetables in boggy ground

Post: # 223190Post madabouthens
Mon Feb 07, 2011 10:20 pm

I would agree with Sarah; we have high rainfall and poor drainage. Raised beds drain better and that allows the soil to warm up more quickly. Don't make the beds too wide, just wide enough to reach across, which means you are not tempted to stand on the beds which would compact the soil.
Tony

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Re: Vegetables in boggy ground

Post: # 223193Post oldjerry
Mon Feb 07, 2011 10:39 pm

3rd response from the raised bed appreciation society.Perfect for all situations,but ESPECIALLY yours. Best Wishes.

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Re: Vegetables in boggy ground

Post: # 223198Post grahamhobbs
Mon Feb 07, 2011 11:05 pm

celery

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Re: Vegetables in boggy ground

Post: # 223205Post zaxdog
Mon Feb 07, 2011 11:46 pm

Thanks guys but the reason I was after plants to grow in boggy ground is that this is a rented house and while we are willing to do a fair bit I am not making the landlord free raised beds :icon_smile: added to which it would be really hard to get the materials to build raised beds without a lot of fuss and expense!

I do like celery though :iconbiggrin:

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Re: Vegetables in boggy ground

Post: # 223209Post Millymollymandy
Tue Feb 08, 2011 6:45 am

Watercress - I'm not kidding, you can buy seeds to grow in a pot which sits on a saucer full of water, so if your ground is always nice and moist it would be the right conditions.
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Re: Vegetables in boggy ground

Post: # 223213Post wulf
Tue Feb 08, 2011 8:03 am

You can create temporary structures. For example, given some support, you could probably press a bag of compost directly into use as a "bed". Pierce some holes in the lower part for drainage (and perhaps sit off the ground on some rubble if the ground underneath is really boggy), slice the top off and you've got an instant container for the price of a bag of compost.

You might want to buy one bag of compost and one of topsoil and fill both with a mixture of the two. I know buying in soil and compost isn't incredibly self-sufficient but, to be honest, you would probably be doing the same even if you built a more robust bed and at least this way you aren't discarding the sacks.

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Re: Vegetables in boggy ground

Post: # 223218Post Odsox
Tue Feb 08, 2011 9:07 am

Do what the Irish did years ago.
Dig your soil and ridge it ... make long "hills" just like earthed up potato rows, and then plant your crops on the ridge top.
That way you can grow just about anything, onions, cauliflower, cabbages, lettuce etc, with the added benefit that the plant can extend it's roots into the boggy bit and get water anytime it wants (no drought worries).
Oh, and your soil could almost certainly do with some lime as I'm sure it's definitely on the acid side.
Tony

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Re: Vegetables in boggy ground

Post: # 223220Post bonniethomas06
Tue Feb 08, 2011 9:24 am

Hmm, nice moist soil....acidic....BLUEBERRIES!!!
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Re: Vegetables in boggy ground

Post: # 223221Post boboff
Tue Feb 08, 2011 9:31 am

Can you borrow some willow whips and plant them against the cliff, this will dry the ground out a bit.

Rhubarb should be ok I think
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Re: Vegetables in boggy ground

Post: # 223222Post fruitcake
Tue Feb 08, 2011 9:49 am

Being in not too dissimilar conditions I can feed back re my experiments of growing in boggy ground - my soft fruit seems to be fine - rasps, blackcurrants, redcurrants, blueberries, strawbs - all good, rhubarb - yep, cranberries - not doing much but i think were slightly strangled by overgrown grass so have moved them. Willow, alder, hazel, elder - all going great guns. I've put a mixed hedge on top of a bank so it's not nearly so wet there but i think it would be fine in the damper areas - includes hawthorn, blackthorn, rosa, elder etc. I find mulching really helps too.

Trying to plant veg straight into the ground - not so positive. I've resorted to building raised beds out of scrap wood left over from housebuilding - they're not posh and they certainly ain't fancy - only 2 planks high and defo makes a difference - oh and they're certainly not straight, lol. Lavender - pretty much rots off - I've moved it to a stony drier place - much better. All my herbs are in pots although lady's mantle, lemon balm and mints will grow anywhere - they are a bit thuggish tho so watch 'em. I've heardthe large lidl bags make good grow bags for spuds - I would defo grow your spubs in bags - the slugs are a pain in the *** here!

Windburn and salt air/spray is prob another joy you have to overcome as well in your location.

Good luck, let us know how you get on :flower:

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Re: Vegetables in boggy ground

Post: # 223481Post Tigerhair
Thu Feb 10, 2011 4:55 pm

We're surrounded by water, and the river seems to "visit" a couple of times a year. So we have a pretty damp garden. However, I have grown a variety of stuff - rhubarb/courgettes/beans/peas - general stuff successfully. Give it a try and grow what you like to eat. I would invest in some grit or sand and mix it in and try not to walk on your ground. A lightness of touch is needed with the damp stuff. Good luck
Tigz x

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Re: Vegetables in boggy ground

Post: # 231245Post cocobelle
Mon May 09, 2011 7:25 am

I would definitely recommend having a go at growing watercress, I used to live in Hampshire which is where I believe the best watercress is farmed. Um watercress & cheese sardines :)
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