Is that English?

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Graye
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Re: Is that English?

Post: # 168740Post Graye
Sat Sep 19, 2009 10:25 pm

I remember scrages! I was always scraging my knees when I was a kid. And how about scrobble? Another word which I thought was "real" English until I was about 10.

I once heard two old chaps at the bus stop in deep conversation about local news. The one said to the other "There was a bint knocked off down Brummagem Road". I would imagine that would be totally incomprehensible to non-Midlanders?
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Millymollymandy
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Re: Is that English?

Post: # 168750Post Millymollymandy
Sun Sep 20, 2009 4:51 am

Perfectly comprehensible, sounds like London/Estuary English to me! :lol:
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Graye
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Re: Is that English?

Post: # 168757Post Graye
Sun Sep 20, 2009 7:59 am

Even Brummagem? I'm surprised...
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Re: Is that English?

Post: # 168779Post mrsflibble
Sun Sep 20, 2009 11:16 am

anarchistinslippers wrote:I can remember talking to a South African colleague about cakes.

Me: "I like teacakes.."
Her: "What are they? Like cupcakes, but bigger?"
Me: "No, they're kind of doughy scones, sometimes with currant/sultanas..."
Her: "Ah, that's a flapjack"
Me: "Naw, a flapjack is oats in syrup, cut into squares.."
Her: "No, that's a muffin.."
Me: "No, that's a teacake with attitude, with a weeks worth of calories.."

Et cetera! :scratch:
same problem, similar conversation, me talking to my texan sister in law.

also getting her to realise that Cilanto is called corriandar here, so the leaves, stalks, roots and seeds all have the same name here was confusing. in texas, corriandar refers to the roots and seeds, cilantro to the leaves and stalks.
oh how I love my tea, tea in the afternoon. I can't do without it, and I think I'll have another cup very
ve-he-he-he-heryyyyyyy soooooooooooon!!!!

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Millymollymandy
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Re: Is that English?

Post: # 168785Post Millymollymandy
Sun Sep 20, 2009 11:40 am

Graye wrote:Even Brummagem? I'm surprised...
Er no, but I thought that was the name of a road!

Birmingham?
boboff wrote:Oh and just for MMM, :hugish: (thanks)
http://chateaumoorhen.blogspot.com/

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Graye
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Re: Is that English?

Post: # 168800Post Graye
Sun Sep 20, 2009 5:35 pm

That's it! Although my son (we're visiting and right in the thick of Brummie accents at the moment) has just pointed out that the right way to say it is Brummajum. I suppose that's where Brum comes from... My Dad's father was a Black Country chap and his "English" was something else. I remember him telling me I couldn't do something like this "Thou mount do thar..." I don't think he knew "you", it was always thee, thou or thy. And my OH thought it was a Yorkshire thing...
Growing old is much better then the alternative!

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Millymollymandy
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Re: Is that English?

Post: # 168822Post Millymollymandy
Mon Sep 21, 2009 4:52 am

I thought thee and thou was a Somerset thing! :lol:
boboff wrote:Oh and just for MMM, :hugish: (thanks)
http://chateaumoorhen.blogspot.com/

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Re: Is that English?

Post: # 168904Post Green Aura
Mon Sep 21, 2009 1:30 pm

I think in Yorkshire it's more thi and tha :lol:
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Re: Is that English?

Post: # 168926Post MuddyWitch
Mon Sep 21, 2009 2:47 pm

I grew up using the second person singulars too (thee, thou, thine etc) in Nottinghamshire.

Most languages use such pronouns, french, spanish, itallian etc. It is actually much easier to work out what people are saying if we use them.

I miss 'one' ie 'if one were to go shopping' rather than 'if you (well, not you literally, it could just as easily be me or one of the kids), went shopping...' conversations with my hubby!

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mrsflibble
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Re: Is that English?

Post: # 168935Post mrsflibble
Mon Sep 21, 2009 3:24 pm

soph has a mostly essex accent, except for words like "bath", "cup" and "bugger" whu=ich all use the nottingham pronounciation. annoying 'cos then James can pin down EXACTLY where she's got certain words from lol.
oh how I love my tea, tea in the afternoon. I can't do without it, and I think I'll have another cup very
ve-he-he-he-heryyyyyyy soooooooooooon!!!!

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Alice Abbott
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Re: Is that English?

Post: # 168940Post Alice Abbott
Mon Sep 21, 2009 4:23 pm

I have a most definite American accent, although as I come from California I like to think it manages to avoid most American excesses. Mack is from Waterford so has a lovely gentle Irish accent. Now the kids seem to have developed a cross between the two - I swear they sound like the Kennedy clan - pure East Coast Bostonians! Not bad going as they have never actually been to the US yet...

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Re: Is that English?

Post: # 168956Post Brij
Mon Sep 21, 2009 7:38 pm

MuddyWitch wrote:I grew up using the second person singulars too (thee, thou, thine etc) in Nottinghamshire.

Most languages use such pronouns, french, spanish, itallian etc. It is actually much easier to work out what people are saying if we use them.

I miss 'one' ie 'if one were to go shopping' rather than 'if you (well, not you literally, it could just as easily be me or one of the kids), went shopping...' conversations with my hubby!

MW
I'm not sure if it is generally colloquial French or if it is the crossed-with-Spanish-version the family I'm staying with speak, but they use the 'tu' (second person singular) rather than 'on' (one - as in anyone) for that sort of thing - as in - you take the second left, go straight ahead and it is on the right. My French boyfriend uses it too... in fact, the only person that really uses the French equivalent of 'one' seems to be me!

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Re: Is that English?

Post: # 169115Post anarchistinslippers
Tue Sep 22, 2009 9:39 pm

Brij wrote:Speaking the Queen's French, me!
But she's bloody German!
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Re: Is that English?

Post: # 169198Post Derry
Wed Sep 23, 2009 12:34 pm

Graye wrote:I remember scrages! I was always scraging my knees when I was a kid. And how about scrobble? Another word which I thought was "real" English until I was about 10.

I once heard two old chaps at the bus stop in deep conversation about local news. The one said to the other "There was a bint knocked off down Brummagem Road". I would imagine that would be totally incomprehensible to non-Midlanders?
not heard scrobble before!

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Re: Is that English?

Post: # 169199Post Derry
Wed Sep 23, 2009 12:37 pm

Graye wrote:That's it! Although my son (we're visiting and right in the thick of Brummie accents at the moment) has just pointed out that the right way to say it is Brummajum. I suppose that's where Brum comes from... My Dad's father was a Black Country chap and his "English" was something else. I remember him telling me I couldn't do something like this "Thou mount do thar..." I don't think he knew "you", it was always thee, thou or thy. And my OH thought it was a Yorkshire thing...
back in t'day, brum used to be called brummagem (but probably spelt proper) and then it kinda evolved into being Birmingham =] but yuss, tis why we'm called brummies

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