How to grow your own salad sprouts

You all seem to be such proficient chefs. Well here is a place to share some of that cooking knowledge. Or do you have a cooking problem? Ask away. Jams and chutneys go here too.
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Trinity
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How to grow your own salad sprouts

Post: # 71461Post Trinity
Wed Sep 19, 2007 12:25 pm

Sprouting seeds is an excellent way of having year round fresh local produce for salad. Soaking seeds releases the enzyme inhibitors which then allows them to grow edible shoots.

We make our own salad sprouts and I thought this may be of interest to some.


There are many things that we can sprout, including, nuts, seeds and grains. I am going to specifically focus on alfalfa, broccoli and clover sprouts here.

Step one: Place a large handful of sprouts in large jar. I use a two litre jar. If you have a smaller jar then experiment with less seeds.

Step two:
Soak the seed for atleast six hours (I usually leave them into soak over night). Use spring or filtered water.

Step three: Place muslin (or fine mesh) over the top of the jar and hold securely in place with an elastic band, drain off the soak water and rinse until the water is clear.

Step four:
Allow any excess water to drain from the jar by tilting upside down at an angle (I leave it on my dish draining rack for a half hour or so). Keep the jar in a light airy place in the kitchen or utility room (I leave it on the kitchen bench).
Image

Step five: Rinse sprouts through and drain as in step four, atleast once per day (in warm weather I recommend rinsing twice a day).

Step six: The sprouts should be ready in about five or six days time when you begin to see green tips on the ends. At this point you need to remove the brown husks. Empty contents of jar into a large bowl. Fill with water until almost full. Agitate the water to make the husks rise to the surface. Spoon out the husks, or splash over the edge into the sink (losing a few sprouts in unavoidable unless you are really meticulous). Fish out the sprouts by hand and put into a sieve. Tip out the husks in the bottom of the bowl. Rinse out the bowl and repeat, removing as many husk as possible. Allow the end product of sprouts to drain free of water through a sieve.

Step seven:
Store in a sealed container in the fridge and they should last for a good five days. (Tip - if they are now sufficiently drained of water they will go soggy, so make sure you drain them well).

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Post: # 71465Post the.fee.fairy
Wed Sep 19, 2007 1:03 pm

Ooh, they look tasty!

I've been wanting to give this a go for a while.

Someone was swapping seeds were't they...i wonder if they'll swap for soap!

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Post: # 71483Post Trinity
Wed Sep 19, 2007 4:28 pm

Seed swapping. I must have missed that one!

Let me know if you try them, and how it goes.

I buy alfalfa from our local food co-operative. They buy in bulk from suma and essentials. I think they only cost about £5 for a kilo if you buy them wholesale. That would last us a year!

We grow sun flower sprouts for salad too. They are sooo tasty and full of nutrients.

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Post: # 71549Post Millymollymandy
Thu Sep 20, 2007 8:43 am

Thanks for the reminder and the great posting with photos. I bought a load of seeds last time I was in England but have been growing them like you do mustard and cress, only I found that the larger seeds needed soil to make them germinate and grow as the larger sprouts can't get their roots through kitchen paper.

I hadn't thought about growing them as sprouts in a jar - haven't done that in years!

By the way something I discovered this summer is that rocket grows as easily as mustard and cress - the seeds are small and of course have that nice rocket taste! Good tip for anyone in a flat with not much chance to grow things. :flower:

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Post: # 71562Post Shirley
Thu Sep 20, 2007 9:25 am

Thanks... you've just reminded me that I've got some alfalfa seeds in the kitchen... :mrgreen: :cheers:
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Post: # 71728Post Trinity
Fri Sep 21, 2007 12:41 pm

Millymollymandy wrote:Thanks for the reminder and the great posting with photos. I bought a load of seeds last time I was in England but have been growing them like you do mustard and cress, only I found that the larger seeds needed soil to make them germinate and grow as the larger sprouts can't get their roots through kitchen paper.

I hadn't thought about growing them as sprouts in a jar - haven't done that in years!

By the way something I discovered this summer is that rocket grows as easily as mustard and cress - the seeds are small and of course have that nice rocket taste! Good tip for anyone in a flat with not much chance to grow things. :flower:
Hiya :flower:

Oooh I am going to try sprouting rocket. I think that we can probably sprout many seeds in the jar/rinse method. The only think that would vary it the timing it take for them to be ready to eat. I am so glad that you mentioned the rocket. It has inspired me to be more creative with what I sprout. I've been gathering mustard seeds this year to grow mustard greens, never thought of sprouting them.

I grow sunflower sprouts too, although you need to sprout them with the husks on. As you mentioned above, they need to be sprouted on a thin layer of soil on a tray. After about a week I just snip of the lushous thick green sprouts and mix them into a salad.

Trin
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Post: # 71729Post Trinity
Fri Sep 21, 2007 12:42 pm

Shirlz wrote:Thanks... you've just reminded me that I've got some alfalfa seeds in the kitchen... :mrgreen: :cheers:
So pleased to hear that it has been of help.
:flower:

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Post: # 78875Post kimmysmum
Fri Dec 14, 2007 10:10 am

I love my sprouts.
I have them growing in a LARGE jar in my kitchen and us very much the same system as Trinity. They are soooo good.
#1 son loves them on a sandwich with cheese and vegemite. :cheers:
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Post: # 78877Post eccentric_emma
Fri Dec 14, 2007 11:36 am

i love having alfalfa sprouts in juice with some mint and cucumber. i just had sunflower sprouts as well and they are gorgeous, they taste just like sunflower seeds but fresher.
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Post: # 78897Post Jack
Fri Dec 14, 2007 7:12 pm

Gidday

Alfalfa is the same thing as lucerne and that is what I use. I don't bother with the muslin and just carefully drain the water off with my fingure. After they have a little size on them, like a couple of days, I just fill the jar with water then hold my hand over the top and invert the jar, letting the water out between my fingure and this gets rid of almost all the husks.
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Post: # 78905Post kimmysmum
Fri Dec 14, 2007 9:52 pm

Hey jack guess we all have our ways to do things and if it works why change it. I use fly wire on the top of the jar as we put shade cloth in all our fly screens and I am finding ways to use the old screen this is one of them.
Happy sprouting :cheers:
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Post: # 78933Post mrsflibble
Sat Dec 15, 2007 11:54 am

oh how I love my tea, tea in the afternoon. I can't do without it, and I think I'll have another cup very
ve-he-he-he-heryyyyyyy soooooooooooon!!!!

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Post: # 78934Post Millymollymandy
Sat Dec 15, 2007 12:33 pm

Hmmmm 'thoroughly cooked' mung bean sprouts would be as pointless as mushy alfalfa - bean sprouts in stir fries should have some crunch! That's why I hate the tinned ones........

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Post: # 78948Post Jack
Sat Dec 15, 2007 6:45 pm

Gidday

Only in America I reckon.

The poor Yanks seem to have scares about all sorts of things. They are dead scared of using poop on their gardens because some contaminated post harvest workers don't have good hygene and blame it on the farmer and his soil.

Most of these diseases get into the food post harvest with the handling and transportation.

That is why it is so important to grow your own veges.
Cheers
just a Rough Country Boy.

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