Whey wine (Blaand)

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BernardSmith
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Whey wine (Blaand)

Post: # 291240Post BernardSmith
Mon May 14, 2018 1:19 pm

For those who make their own cheese here's something else you might consider doing with the whey - make a wine. You simply take the leftover whey: what you are looking for is a) the flavor and b) the remaining lactose sugars (which are not fermentable under normal conditions - they are too complex for wine or beer yeasts to breakdown) To this you add some fermentable sugar (could be honey or table sugar or maple syrup or ??). For lower alcohol drinks similar to a beer or cider you might add about .5 kg (1 lb) to each 4 liters (gallon), for something closer to a wine you might add 1 kg. Mix and then add a packet of wine or ale yeast (or even bread yeast).
This may take about two weeks to ferment and then you might add fruit (strawberries?) or nuts (peanuts?) or coffee or even chocolate (cocoa beans?) for additional flavor. The flavor of whey wine itself is a little unusual. It has great "mouthfeel" (viscosity) and is slightly piquant - and presumably will be more or less acidic depending on the cheese that was made with that batch of milk.

The idea of using the whey leftover from cheese making is apparently very old and the wines made from this were called "blaand" (blonde? )in Scotland. The trouble is that blaand was not made commercially but only as part of a cottage industry and it seems to have fallen out of favor in the last 100 years as cheese moved from being made at home to being made industrially. Finding authentic recipes for blaand is a challenge but my sense is that people would have simply used bread yeast if they were adding fermentable sugars or would have found some way to add a very specific yeast to ferment the lactose (Candida pseudotropicalis, for example). But today, you can make a whey "wine" that would have the same alcohol content as kombucha or kvass simply by adding lactase to the whey which would break down the lactose into fermentable sugars and so simply add a bread or wine yeast (they are the same thing).
I started a batch of whey wine last night after removing the curds to start a batch of blue cheese. If folk are interested I will keep you informed of the progress and any "tasting notes". (The University of Oregon, here in the USA, was involved in a study in the 70's to look at the economic viability of using whey to make wine and the paper they published did look at this in a very positive light).

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Re: Whey wine (Blaand)

Post: # 291244Post Green Aura
Mon May 14, 2018 3:24 pm

Very interesting. I often make Crowdie, which leaves huge amounts of very sweet whey. I'm not planning any in the near future but I'll try and remember this when I do.

Do let us know how it progresses.
Maggie

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BernardSmith
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Re: Whey wine (Blaand)

Post: # 291246Post BernardSmith
Mon May 14, 2018 6:26 pm

Interestingly, Maggie, this batch of whey wine was made from the whey leftover from a batch of blue cheese. I had used kefir to culture the milk and blue cheese cultures for the P Roqueforti. I never measured the pH but had allowed the milk to ripen at 90F (about 32 C) for 60 minutes and had allowed the rennet to coagulate the milk for 90 minutes, stirring for about 30 so all in all the milk (and so the whey) was exposed to acidifying cultures for a little more than 3 hours at temperature. My sense is that this will result in an acidic rather than a sweet whey but I am not trying to ferment the lactose here. My focus is on fermenting the honey. I am hoping that the acidity will balance the residual sweetness and provide additional "complexity".

At this stage I am not sure whether I want to add fruit (mangoes, perhaps - or strawberries ) to the secondary to make this a sortof kindof alcoholic milk shake or to add cocoa nibs to make this a chocolate drink...

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