Radish and turnip

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fruitfly
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Radish and turnip

Post: #288977 fruitfly
Thu Feb 02, 2017 4:12 pm

1. I bought some new radish seed before coming across some old ones in the shed. Regarding the old ones, will they be safe to eat as microgreens, either up to a cress-like point or with a few more leaves (assuming they are still viable), and
2. in an effort to get a wee bit more for my money, am I likely to be successful in cutting the tops of shop-bought turnips and sitting them in a saucer of water to grow some turnip tops for salad?
Thank you!

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Odsox
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Re: Radish and turnip

Post: #288980 Odsox
Thu Feb 02, 2017 4:18 pm

Yes to both of your questions.
Radish seed should remain viable for at least 6 years, regardless what it says on the packet.
Tony

Disclaimer: I almost certainly haven't a clue what I'm talking about.

fruitfly
Tom Good
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Re: Radish and turnip

Post: #289039 fruitfly
Tue Feb 07, 2017 8:01 pm

Yes, indeed. The radish seed have started to sprout and the turnip tops have grown a good centimetre since I put them in a saucer of water!

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Tom Good
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Re: Radish and turnip

Post: #289040 Weedo
Tue Feb 07, 2017 9:51 pm

Showing my Oz ignorance again, but how do you (can you) use turnip tops and are there any particular varieties that are better than others? I have eaten the turnip bulb from varieties planted for livestock grazing and they are fine but are the tops OK?

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Odsox
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Re: Radish and turnip

Post: #289041 Odsox
Wed Feb 08, 2017 8:58 am

Turnip tops are (or used to be) a vital source of greens in spring, along with the flowering shoots of Brussels sprouts and cabbage stumps, which all got lumped together as "spring greens". Or used to be called spring greens as the supermarkets now sell immature cabbages as spring greens when they should really be called collards.
Basically it was frugaldom when it was a lifestyle, by making very good use of spent plants to produce another crop when fresh food was scarce.
Turnip greens are actually very tasty.
Tony

Disclaimer: I almost certainly haven't a clue what I'm talking about.


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